Productive Ideas That Create Creativity

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ideas

ideas (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

No matter what type of creativity you crave, chances are you are always looking for inspiration. In the writing world it has never been easier to share our imagination, ideas and creative thoughts with others through proper use of the internet. It is also tougher as well. With all the distractions life has to offer, and all the others available online, a writer of any level can find themselves far from where they want to be creatively. Below is a short list of tips that may help to get your creative juices flowing, some will help to provide productive distraction that eventually leads you back to the creative world, while others will provide you with a new outlook on your approach to writing.

Productive Ideas To Create Creativity:

  • Write it out. No matter how silly, strange or unstructured, get it on paper so it is not stuck in your head.
  • When inspiration hits, drop everything and indulge.
  • Play with children. They see the world differently and can be a huge source of inspiration.
  • When you are not inspired, don’t write. This is the ideal time to enjoy distractions, who knows maybe they will spark an idea.
  • One small idea can be just as great as 100 big ones.
  • If something is messing up your mojo, move it or lose it entirely. This includes people.
  • Don’t be afraid to take a break. Spending too much time on one task creates stress and leads to less productivity in the long-run.
  • Get up, get out, get moving. Exercise and human interaction are excellent for the creative brain.
  • Make it fun. If you are feeling really blocked make your work into a game. Try naming 100 things that start with B, or that are red. When you make writing fun again your brain is more likely to co-operate.
  • Don’t force an idea. It is better to let an idea enter your mind itself than to try to force it. Forcing the idea too early often leads to frustration and eventually confusion due to over-thinking. Let it simmer, it’ll come.
  • Change the way you write. Sometimes a simple change of style is enough to get you back on track.
  • Seek inspiration in the small things. A short post about anything takes the same level of creativity as a large piece, but less time and sometimes more freedom. Spend time writing small things, even if you never publish them, they can be useful sources in the future and often lead to larger works down the line.
  • Write everything down. If you are a writer you should have a pen and paper (or something of the sort) at all times. As soon as an idea strikes write it down. Be sure to add as many details as possible so you are not looking back at a note later wondering what “One Eyes Pete and the laser of life” means.
  • Share what you have learned with others. Teaching others is a wonderful way to inspire yourself.
  • Update the past. If you are at a loss pick up older pieces and give them a fresh start, or a face lift.
  • Nix the negativity. Whether it is your own self-inflicted negativity or the criticism of others, dwelling on it is not going to get anything done. Lesson number one in life: You will have far more haters than you ever will fans. (So it’s probably best if you are on your own side.)
  • Stop aiming for perfection. The best thing you can do is write it, and get feedback. Don’t try to make it a final draft the first time around, you will end up miserable and overworked, with a wreck of a story that has been hacked to death. Remember the worst that can happen is that it will suck…. Guess what? It can be deleted and re-written!
  • Enjoy yourself. If it’s not enjoyable for you then don’t do it at all.

Until Next Time…

Write On!

Quick Tips for Character Creation

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Realistic and lovable characters are a major part of good fiction. Character creation can be one of the most challenging parts of writing, and a lack of in-depth characterization can completely ruin a great plot. Below are a few simple and basic tips to help you create solid characters, with depth and personality, that add to the story-line and help to make your piece as close to perfect as possible.

Quick Tips for Character Creation

  1. Every character in your story needs to have a story themselves, you don’t need to spend hours getting to know your secondary characters but you should have a basic outline for everyone involved in the tale. Make notes of important information such as name, age, job, social status, gender, relationship status, and any other relevant basic personal information. Rule of thumb; know your secondary characters like you know your acquaintances, and your main characters as you know your best friends.
  2. Along with their story each character needs a goal. This goal may be something simple or a large mission to save the world, either way this goal needs to be clear and have purpose behind it.
  3. To tie together the above factors of a story and a goal, your characters need to have a history. Even the simplest of characters has to have a past that somehow connects them to what is happening in the present moment. The characters of a story are often connected through an intricate spiderweb. John may know Sheila through her cousin Paul, who has been murdered by Ben, and John might be Ben’s Uncle. Whatever the case each of your characters has to have at least a slight past and some form of connection to the story that you are writing. They need a reason for being where they are, with who they are, and for what they are doing. The process of creating history takes time and organization, plan carefully and be sure that you fill any holes.
  4. Once you have the basics of each character you need to personalize them. The best way to bring your character to life is to give them real life issues. Habits, compulsions, and obsessions are a great way of making your characters more human. Perhaps your main character is a compulsive hand-washer, a smoker, an alcoholic or is constantly quoting cheesy comedy films, whatever the case they need to have a human habit that others can relate to, something that makes them vulnerable and realistic and life-like.
  5. Build emotion in your character to create empathy and connect them with your readers. Even the most frightening of villains has to have a soft spot, some one needs to be able to connect with what makes this character tick. The deepest emotion a character can express is crying, but they need not actually cry to express this human trait, just showing that there is something that is capable of causing this sentiment is enough to connect them to the real world. Find the one thing that would hurt your character and share it in some way with your readers, this builds trust and creates a connection.
  6. In line with personalizing your character, be sure you create flaws. Flaws are another way of humanizing a fictional character. People are not perfect, and they will not enjoy reading about someone who is. Create some kind of flaw for your main characters to help your readers relate to them. Perhaps they harbor a deep dislike for another character in your story, maybe they lie a lot, swear a lot, or have trouble focusing on what is important. Give your characters some kind of flaw so they are not perfect, unbelievable icons that your readers can not relate to on a personal level.
  7. The last step in character creation is to ensure that you have covered all the bases. Sort out all the details of your characters, especially your main characters, such as personality, appearance, distinctive traits and personal information. You should know your main characters as well as you know yourself. Even if you are not going to use the information as part of the story line, things like zodiac sign, and favorite foods, will help you connect to the characters and create a consistent flow in your writing. Creating characters is a bit like being an actor, you need to get into the role and be a part of who they are. Let your imagination run wild and remember the more information you have the better.

How you create your characters differs with each writer, some writers prefer to outline all characters before they write a single word, where others will set out the basics of their main characters and create the rest along the way. Experiment and find what works best for you. The great thing about writing is that there are really no rules and you have the freedom to be creative. If you are a beginner than character creation may take a bit of time, but with practice it will become easier. Keep in mind how important a solid character is, and think of the time spent creating them as an investment in your story. The process can be tedious but it is worth the effort to have a well-rounded character without any gray areas or unanswered questions. Take your time and be thorough, and most of all have fun. The sky is the limit and you can go wherever your imagination will allow you.

 

Until Next Time…

Write On!

Sure-Fire Ways to Kick-Start Creativity

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Writer's Block

Image by thorinside via Flickr

Keeping your content fresh and up-to-date is an important part of running a successful blog. Finding the inspiration to write new and fresh posts can often pose a problem.

Below is a list of a few sure-fire ways to kick-start your creativity and get you writing:

  • Forget Your Focus and Just Write – Not every word you jot down is going to end up in a great piece of writing. One of the greatest ways to get inspired is to forget that you need inspiration. Sit down with a pen and paper, or your computer, and just write without expectations or direction. Free writing like this can create an abundance of brilliant ideas. Don’t concern yourself with making sense or staying on topic, just write whatever comes to mind and then save the results for a later time when they may help to spark your creativity.
  • Tamper with Titles – One of the ways I get myself writing when I am in a rut is to create a list of ‘titles’ I want to write. Like headlines in the newspaper I come up with catchy post titles and work from there. I always keep this list handy, adding to it, and completing posts as I go. By writing only the titles you may find yourself creating topics that require deeper research, more creativity, or entirely different perspectives. Every time a catchy title comes to mind jot it down, it may turn into your top post!
  • Mind your Memories – When you are in serious need of inspiration it sometimes helps to refer to the ‘good-old-days’. Telling stories has always been a big part of human nature, use stories from your past to enhance your present. Share a great childhood memory, or tell of a time that you overcame a fear, write about your greatest success, or even your crazy Uncle Billy. Your story can become everyone’s story if you take the time to tap into the endless inspiration you hold within your mind.
  • Re-write to Ignite – Another simple way to find inspiration and creativity is to review and re-write your older posts. Chances are you have some very old content that could use a bit of a ‘face-lift’, reviewing and re-writing these posts will not only help the overall appearance of your site, chances are it will inspire you to write something new, or expand on an old idea in a new way. In the very least your blog will be fresh and showcasing your best material.
  • Read to Write – If you are trying to write about a specific topic it often helps to see what others are writing about it. Often tips I will search a specific topic, quickly view a few articles, and wait for inspiration to strike. If you are not writing about anything specifically then try checking out the top searches today, top news, top tweets, or just hit random websites for inspiration. StumbleUpon is great source of inspiration, taking you to different websites based on your interests.  Reading anything will usually help if you keep an open mind and allow yourself creative freedom.
  • Remember the Routine – The most basic advice to writers will hold true until the end of time. Make Time To Write! This can not be stressed enough. Having a regularly scheduled writing time will get your mind in gear for writing. Pencil in some writing time everyday to help fight writer’s block. By keeping writing as part of your daily schedule you will not only be forming a good habit for a career, but you will be prompting your creative mind to be ready as well.

The most important thing to remember when you are lacking creativity is to keep searching for inspiration, but don’t overwhelm yourself. If you are getting frustrated move on to something else until you are ready to face the challenge again. Writers on every level suffer from lack of creativity at some point, just keep writing and never give up.

 

What do you do to beat writer’s block?
Share your tips and tricks in the comment section below. 

Until Next Time…

Write On!

 

*Questions, comments, or submissions can be sent to: perfectlyprompted@live.ca*

Flash Fiction Challenge Post 2

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I have just posted my second story in my month of July Flash Fiction Challenge over on Complicated Chaos. Feel free to check it out. The story is titled ‘Higher Power

 

As always comments and feedback are appreciated, and feel free to share links to your own site as well…

 

 

Until Next Time…

Write On!

Finding Inspiration to Write… What to do when you can’t get started.

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Writing

Image via Wikipedia

Writing is a lot easier if you have something to say
– Sholem Asch

Sometimes the hardest part of writing is finding a subject to write about. Those that have suffered from Writer’s Block, know the helpless feeling lack of inspiration can cause, and even the most creative soul can lack ideas from time to time.

So how do you get started when it seems there is nothing there to write? 

If you hope to succeed as a writer you must seek out inspiration at every turn. When times get tough you must fight through the wall and find a source for your words. Like an artist, words are your paint, you need to learn to use every color if you hope to create a masterpiece. Inspiration is available all around you, you simply need to open your eyes, and your mind, to let it in. If you are faced with a creative block and can’t seem to find a suitable subject, try out these tips to get your mind working and spark your creativity:

Finding Inspiration to get you Started

  • Read – Often times the best way to get inspired is by reading what someone else has written. I have said this many times before, and I will say it many times in the future. Some of my most inspiring writing is brought on by reading another writer’s blog. Not everything needs to be a ‘great new idea’ it is perfectly acceptable to take someone else’s idea and make it your own. Next time you stumble across a blog, article, or story you enjoy consider how you can expand upon it and make it your own. The only rule here is to provide credit where credit is due and link back to the inspiration.
  • Get out and about – Sometimes all it takes is a little socialization to get your gears going. Meet up with a friend for a chat, or head to a busy café and strike up conversation with a stranger. Conversation produces ideas, and ideas can be turned into art, so get up, get dressed, and get talking… Even a short chat on your favorite social media site can stir up creativity so log on to Facebook and enjoy a chat.
  • Savor the Silence – When social situations are not the inspiring, often time solitude is what we seek. The silence and beauty that peace and quite brings is often very inspiring for a writer. Head to a quiet place in nature, like a hidden beach or quiet forest and simply savor the silence, listening only to the sounds around you and your thoughts. If you can’t get outdoor create solitude inside, retreat to a quiet room, or head to the local library for some down time. Bookstores, art galleries and museums are also inspiring and relatively free of crowds. Bring along a notebook and jot down any ideas that come to mind. Enjoy the peace and allow your creativity to connect.
  • Tune in – Music can be very inspiring for a writer. Next time you are lacking a subject to start your writing step away and crank up the tunes. Listen to the lyrics (if there are any) and really consider how the song makes you feel. Ask yourself what the artist is trying to say through the piece, and allow their inspiration to fuel your own.
  • He said, She said – Quotes are another excellent source of inspiration. A few simple lines can spark endless possibilities. Head over to your favorite quote site, (I like q.uote.it) and immerse yourself in the words of others. There are quotes available on literally ‘thousands’ of topics, and they are a great way to start off your writing (see above) or inspire you to expand. When reading quotes consider not only the words and the source, but the underlying symbolism that these simple pieces often hold. Allow your mind to fully process each written word, and evaluate how they truly make you feel.
  • Just Breathe – Not every moment is meant to be spent writing. If you find that you just cannot find inspiration to get started simply step away. Often times a short break is all that a writer needs to regain perspective and get their creativity back in gear. Take a short walk, step outside, have a bath or do the housework. Focus on something else for a while until you are ready to tackle the task again. By taking time out to relax you are clearing the clutter of your mind and allowing new thoughts and ideas to enter.

If all else fails don’t forget to visit the Prompt section of this site. Writing prompts can be a great way to get started and often lead to other ideas. You can view the prompts this site has available HERE or follow the link at the top of the page.

 

Until Next Time…

Write On!

How do you cope when you are lacking inspiration?
Where do you find sources for your writing?

Death By Scrabble – Share and Shine Sundays

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This ‘Share and Shine Sunday’ I wanted to post a great short story that I came across online. It is humorous and put a smile on my face, and I hope it does the same for you.

Check it out:

Charlie Fish

Death By Scrabble

It’s a hot day and I hate my wife.

We’re playing Scrabble. That’s how bad it is. I’m 42 years old, it’s a blistering hot Sunday afternoon and all I can think of to do with my life is to play Scrabble.

I should be out, doing exercise, spending money, meeting people. I don’t think I’ve spoken to anyone except my wife since Thursday morning. On Thursday morning I spoke to the milkman.

My letters are crap.

I play, appropriately, BEGIN. With the N on the little pink star. Twenty-two points.

I watch my wife’s smug expression as she rearranges her letters. Clack, clack, clack. I hate her. If she wasn’t around, I’d be doing something interesting right now. I’d be climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. I’d be starring in the latest Hollywood blockbuster. I’d be sailing the Vendee Globe on a 60-foot clipper called the New Horizons – I don’t know, but I’d be doing something.

She plays JINXED, with the J on a double-letter score. 30 points. She’s beating me already. Maybe I should kill her.

If only I had a D, then I could play MURDER. That would be a sign. That would be permission.

I start chewing on my U. It’s a bad habit, I know. All the letters are frayed. I play WARMER for 22 points, mainly so I can keep chewing on my U.

As I’m picking new letters from the bag, I find myself thinking – the letters will tell me what to do. If they spell out KILL, or STAB, or her name, or anything, I’ll do it right now. I’ll finish her off.

My rack spells MIHZPA. Plus the U in my mouth. Damn.

The heat of the sun is pushing at me through the window. I can hear buzzing insects outside. I hope they’re not bees. My cousin Harold swallowed a bee when he was nine, his throat swelled up and he died. I hope that if they are bees, they fly into my wife’s throat.

She plays SWEATIER, using all her letters. 24 points plus a 50 point bonus. If it wasn’t too hot to move I would strangle her right now.

I am getting sweatier. It needs to rain, to clear the air. As soon as that thought crosses my mind, I find a good word. HUMID on a double-word score, using the D of JINXED. The U makes a little splash of saliva when I put it down. Another 22 points. I hope she has lousy letters.

She tells me she has lousy letters. For some reason, I hate her more.

She plays FAN, with the F on a double-letter, and gets up to fill the kettle and turn on the air conditioning.

It’s the hottest day for ten years and my wife is turning on the kettle. This is why I hate my wife. I play ZAPS, with the Z doubled, and she gets a static shock off the air conditioning unit. I find this remarkably satisfying.

She sits back down with a heavy sigh and starts fiddling with her letters again. Clack clack. Clack clack. I feel a terrible rage build up inside me. Some inner poison slowly spreading through my limbs, and when it gets to my fingertips I am going to jump out of my chair, spilling the Scrabble tiles over the floor, and I am going to start hitting her again and again and again.

The rage gets to my fingertips and passes. My heart is beating. I’m sweating. I think my face actually twitches. Then I sigh, deeply, and sit back into my chair. The kettle starts whistling. As the whistle builds it makes me feel hotter.

She plays READY on a double-word for 18 points, then goes to pour herself a cup of tea. No I do not want one.

I steal a blank tile from the letter bag when she’s not looking, and throw back a V from my rack. She gives me a suspicious look. She sits back down with her cup of tea, making a cup-ring on the table, as I play an 8-letter word: CHEATING, using the A of READY. 64 points, including the 50-point bonus, which means I’m beating her now.

She asks me if I cheated.

I really, really hate her.

She plays IGNORE on the triple-word for 21 points. The score is 153 to her, 155 to me.

The steam rising from her cup of tea makes me feel hotter. I try to make murderous words with the letters on my rack, but the best I can do is SLEEP.

My wife sleeps all the time. She slept through an argument our next-door neighbours had that resulted in a broken door, a smashed TV and a Teletubby Lala doll with all the stuffing coming out. And then she bitched at me for being moody the next day from lack of sleep.

If only there was some way for me to get rid of her.

I spot a chance to use all my letters. EXPLODES, using the X of JINXED. 72 points. That’ll show her.

As I put the last letter down, there is a deafening bang and the air conditioning unit fails.

My heart is racing, but not from the shock of the bang. I don’t believe it – but it can’t be a coincidence. The letters made it happen. I played the word EXPLODES, and it happened – the air conditioning unit exploded. And before, I played the word CHEATING when I cheated. And ZAP when my wife got the electric shock. The words are coming true. The letters are choosing their future. The whole game is – JINXED.

My wife plays SIGN, with the N on a triple-letter, for 10 points.

I have to test this.

I have to play something and see if it happens. Something unlikely, to prove that the letters are making it happen. My rack is ABQYFWE. That doesn’t leave me with a lot of options. I start frantically chewing on the B.

I play FLY, using the L of EXPLODES. I sit back in my chair and close my eyes, waiting for the sensation of rising up from my chair. Waiting to fly.

Stupid. I open my eyes, and there’s a fly. An insect, buzzing around above the Scrabble board, surfing the thermals from the tepid cup of tea. That proves nothing. The fly could have been there anyway.

I need to play something unambiguous. Something that cannot be misinterpreted. Something absolute and final. Something terminal. Something murderous.

My wife plays CAUTION, using a blank tile for the N. 18 points.

My rack is AQWEUK, plus the B in my mouth. I am awed by the power of the letters, and frustrated that I cannot wield it. Maybe I should cheat again, and pick out the letters I need to spell SLASH or SLAY.

Then it hits me. The perfect word. A powerful, dangerous, terrible word.

I play QUAKE for 19 points.

I wonder if the strength of the quake will be proportionate to how many points it scored. I can feel the trembling energy of potential in my veins. I am commanding fate. I am manipulating destiny.

My wife plays DEATH for 34 points, just as the room starts to shake.

I gasp with surprise and vindication – and the B that I was chewing on gets lodged in my throat. I try to cough. My face goes red, then blue. My throat swells. I draw blood clawing at my neck. The earthquake builds to a climax.

I fall to the floor. My wife just sits there, watching.

 

Feel free to share your thoughts on this story in the comment area. The original posting, and many others, can be found Here. 

If you have a story or piece of work you would like to share please email submissions to:
perfectlyprompted@live.ca 
(Please state if you would like to remain anonymous) 

Short Story Writing Tips to Get You Started

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Most of my posts for the most part up to now have been related to blogging so I wanted to widen the horizons here on Perfectly Prompted. Many people who write tend to do so in a variety of forms. Perhaps your dabble in poetry, maybe you write lyrics, or short stories might be your outlet of choice. Today we are going to focus on the latter, Short Story writing.

Short story writing is an excellent outlet for creativity that is adaptable to a modern world. Many writers want to write the next best-seller, they dream of writing novels with intricate plots, well-rounded characters, and detailed description, but often they just don’t have the time. Short stories can be a great alternative to a longer piece, and still give you the satisfaction of a finished, well-developed work of art with less strain on your day-to-day life. They are also an excellent stepping stone to develop your skills for the moment when you do find the time to write that award-winning novel.

This post will give you a quick look at the benefits of short story writing, and provide tips to help you get started.  (Also, check out the prompts at the end of this post for fun story ideas)

In the world of short story writing there are no real rules. Writers are constantly creating and evolving in the genre, and any rules that do exist often get tested, pushed to the limit, or broken. There are a few basics to short story writing that can often be a helpful guide, especially for a beginner, but remember a story needs to astonish and thrill a reader or it is not worth reading, no matter how short it is.

The first thing to remember when writing a short story is the amount of information you are presenting in such a small space, because the length of short stories is substantially shorter than that of a full-scale novel, or even a novella, it is important you pay close attention what goes in to it. (You do not want to overwhelm the reader with useless information and leave them wondering where the story went and so, nothing should be written that does not relate to the protagonist, or the issue they are facing in the story.) Unlike a novel where the main character may face many different issues through out the storyline, a short story presents only one issue for your character to deal with. This single issue should cause the main character to be torn emotionally and should generally cause them to fight or contend with someone else in the story, this person would be the antagonist.

Generally speaking both characters will face the same issue but have opposing positions, or views, about it. What happens in the story is kept simple and is the result of the battle between the two contending sides. The problems that these characters faces usually does not end well, this part of the story would be the crisis, these characters usually know each other, (they are not usually strangers as a short story does not give ample time to develop a relationship) and often times they are closely related such as family members/best friends. The battle between these characters generally has a few rounds before the conclusion or resolution.

The general rule of short story writing is that the crisis and resolution change the protagonists life forever, and they never truly win the fight, as they are never quite the same no matter the result. The end of the short story, which is called the dénouement, should give the reader some idea of how the character goes on in life. In other words; the story must always tie up the loose ends and not leave the reader wondering what happened. Unlike novels or movies, short stories will have no follow-ups, so all issues must be resolved within the frame of the writing.

Symbolism plays a huge part in short stories. Many of the more popular short stories have deep symbolic meanings embedded in the text for the reader to consider at a later time or as they read. If you are unfamiliar with symbolism it is something you should study, at least briefly, as it can play a key role in a good short story.

Lastly, short stories always begin at the beginning of the end, there is no time to start earlier. A good writer will fill the reader in on the past quickly and efficiently through well-written description and strong character development.

Those are the basics of short story writing, but as I said before; when it comes to short stories these ‘rules’ are often evolved, expanded on and regularly broken. The only real rule to a short story is that the writers imagination has created it. Even the length of a short story is in perpetual debate, generally it is a story that is no more than 20,000 words and no less than 1,000, but this criteria is pushed and changed as often as the other listed rules. Basically, a short story is whatever you make it out to be and it fits ‘generally’ into the basic criteria for the genre.

There are many benefits to short story writing. It is less time-consuming, the plot, characters, and story itself are easier to compose and keep track of, and the market for such work is vast. Probably one of the greatest benefits to short story writing (besides creative freedom) is the market available for such pieces. Unlike with novel-writing, most short story publishers do not require that submissions be solicited by an agent, and so new writers can easily get their foot in the door and start a career. The pay scale for such work varies drastically, but an author can quickly make a name for themselves and earn a good income if they are a good writer.

If you have never tried writing a short story (besides the ones you had to write in school) I highly suggest you make an attempt to do so now. This form allows you creative freedom and helps to develop your craft without much effort, or substantial time. Below I have listed some short story prompts to help get you started, give them a try, and feel free to post your finished product (or a link to it) in the comments section. (Please don’t be shy, this is a ‘writer friendly’ environment for everyone beginner to advanced.)

Short Story Prompts to Get You Started:

  • A girl is snooping around her best friends apartment and finds a disturbing photograph in her drawer…
  • Your main character suspects that her/his partner is having an affair and decides to spy on them, what does she/he find?
  • At a local flea market your character buys an antique lamp and finds a note hidden inside.
  • At the airport a stranger talks your character into carrying a mysterious package on to the plane. The character gets stopped by security, it is not drugs, so what is inside the package?
  • Your character picks up a hitch-hiker on the way home who presents them with a strange opportunity…
  • Your character is being blackmailed. Why? and by who?
  • Your character arrives home and can immediately sense that something is not right, how? what?why?
  • Your character is confronted by a person from the past who tries to apologize for…
  • Your character is reading a book when they hear a strange noise. Looking up they see it outside the window…
  • Pick someone from a ‘personal ad’ online (or in the paper) and write a story based only on how they look, or what is written about them.
  • Use the following line to begin your story: “I couldn’t help but stare…”
  • Write a story with a dark hallway, a broken vase, and one lost slipper…
  • Create a story about Greg McDougall, a lonely investment banker on the rooftop ledge…

Feel free to create (and even submit) your own prompts as well. As always comments are welcome, as are links to your site, or finished pieces relating to the content. You can submit these in the comments area or email them to perfectlyprompted@live.ca if you wish to remain anonymous.

Here are a few last-minute short story tips to get you writing:

– Who is your protagonist and what does he/she want?
– When the story begins what actions has your character already taken that have brought him/her to this point?
– What unexpected consequences will your protagonist face due to their actions? Will this change their mind yet again? How many times?
– What details are important to ensure your story is complete? Which are not? (eg: avoid travel scenes, filler conversation, and things that have already been observed or stated previously)
– What final choice will your character make at the climax of the story? (It should be unexpected, and your reader should feel connected to this choice)

 

Until Next Time…

Write On!

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